How can we measure and value social capital for business decision-making and reporting?
Social capital refers to relationships between individuals or groups and the resulting ability to secure or obtain resources, knowledge and information. Despite the importance given to relationships in business leadership and management, it is remarkable how little explicit, structured attention is often given to assessing and improving them. We define social capital and provide an overview of its business benefits, and we also outline measures and tools that can be used to assess the key dimensions of social capital.

For more information on the project or reports, please contact Kristy Faccer, kfaccer@nbs.net

The Latest From the Social Capital Blog

Social Capital Blog

Systematic Review: Measuring and Valuing Social Capital

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Download(s): Systematic Review

This comprehensive review describes what social capital is, how it is measured, and the value it provides to individuals, organisations and communities.

Executive Report: Measuring and Valuing Social Capital

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Download(s): Executive Report

“It’s not what you know but who you know.” This guide shows how businesses can make social capital part of their decision-making and reporting.

The Theory of Creativity

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Research suggests political correctness positively affects workplace creativity by sharpening an individual’s contribution to a group.

How Insertech Sets High Standards for Social Enterprises

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Even motivated individuals can find themselves down on their luck. Perhaps they immigrated to a new community in which their skillset doesn’t match the labour… Read More

Better Late! Than Never

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Late! operates just like any other business; the difference is that all profits are devoted entirely to social projects.

Pay It Forward

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With Lumni, investors participate in professional and academic advancement students. The goal is to reduce the student’s risk while attracting investors.

Good is the New Black

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Animaná connects those at the start of the value chain—artisans, weavers, small-scale farmers—to those to those at the end—designers, companies, consumers.

Primer: Measuring and Valuing Social Capital

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Download(s): Primer

In business as in life, relationships matter. The integrated reporting movement emphasizes the importance of such “social capital,” urging companies to report on it. This… Read More


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